MATURITY

June 7, 2017 10:06 AM Sarthak Byanjankar


See no evil, hear no evil, and say no evil. This is the three monkey principle that every one of us has come across at one point in our lives. Additionally, our schools also preached the motto ‘Be good, Do good’. But what they fail to encompass is just because you close your eyes, the inherent evil in this world doesn’t dissipate, just like closing your eyes doesn’t transform day into night. One shouldn’t assume that just because one cuts off oneself from hearing any spoken evil, the world won’t cease to express them. Similarly when one refrains from speaking any evil about others, one should always be prepared to accept the possibility of being spoken about in negative connotations. The motto of the school, though it sounds good, isn’t practical. The world is ruled not by the good ones but those who cross the gray lines and disguise themselves as one of the good ones.

They say maturity isn’t synonymous with age. Maturity is when one can accept perfection in imperfections, and when one realizes that the world is far from perfect. It is when one can let go of core beliefs that one is willing to adapt oneself to the blowing wind. But therein lies the problem. If one were to mature in the truest sense of the word, he’d no longer be his old self. Thus, one must be willing to forego any notion of being and accept the imperfections rooted within perfection.

One can either be a king in life and face a small chance of being crucified by history or lead a saint’s life and face impossible odds of being championed after one’s demise. Everyone is judged by people based on their actions, if not in-front then behind their backs. But keep in mind no ill is spoken after death. Even the greatest villains find word of praise from their harshest critiques when on their death beds. So you have to decide what’d you like, a guarantee of greatness while alive, or a difficult life that leads to praise in the afterlife. Whatever you choose, you must keep in mind that history is framed often by the victors.

The writer is a student at Pulchowk Engineering College.


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