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Nepal to seek Indian support for international stadium in Pokhara
NOC passes budget of Rs 32 million
Nepal-India Joint Commission meeting today
PM, DPM at odds in Rinpoche cremation row
Khurkut bridge brings happiness to all but porters
Poisoning death of newly-wed over dowry suspected
All illegally-run crusher plants in Dang shut down
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KOSH RAJ KOIRALA

 
 
PM, DPM at odds in Rinpoche cremation row

SANTOSH GHIMIRE
KATHMANDU, July 25: The cabinet meeting on Friday could not take any decision on whether or not to allow the cremation in Kathmandu of the Guru Shamar Rinpoche as demanded by his followers, although Prime Minister Sushil Koirala himself was positive toward the demand.

The cabinet meeting couldn’t take any decision as Deputy Prime Minister Bamdev Gautam strongly opposed the idea of allowing the final rites of the Rinpoche to be held in the country. [More]

  Palms up lines of destiny  
  BY SEWA BHATTARAI  
 
What one astrologer may define as a good indicator may be defined as bad by another.

Palmistry, or the science of predicting a person’s nature, behavior, past and future through the lines of their hand, is an ancient science much revered throughout the ages. But of late, the authenticity of the science is frequently called into question by many who believe astrology is just mumbo-jumbo.

Punya Prasad Adhikari, 77, who holds a doctorate in Jyotish Shastra (astrology), believes it is a science with its own precise rules and measurements. He uses a microscope to look at the finer lines on a hand, and claims to know all the details about a person, down to the score they get in examinations.
“One day, a foreign diplomat came to see me,” said Adhikari. “I correctly told him the color of his car, approximated its number, and even told him what diseases his family members had.” Adhikari believes indicators of the entire body can be found in the hands.

 
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  • Are you on time?
    MANISHA NEUPANE
    Youths talk about punctuality

    KATHMANDU, July 25: It wouldn’t be wrong to say that Nepal is a country where very few people understand the true value of time. We hardly reach anywhere on time, and we have ample excuses to our rescue—‘I couldn’t catch a bus in time,’ ‘There was a terrible traffic jam,’ ‘I couldn’t iron my dress in time due to load shedding,’ etc. In fact, we’ve excused ourselves so often that our habitual tardiness has become a tradition—the tradition of ‘Nepali time’ in which one can expect someone to be at least half an hour late.

    And while we know that this so-called tradition needs to be given up right now, it’s so deeply rooted in our society that it needs some time to get over it. In this edition of chitchat, we sat down with five youths to know about their perception of punctuality, their experiences with tardiness, and their views on what we can actually do to get rid of Nepali time.   [More]
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